Service Availability Management

Since SAP Focused Run is measuring availability issues, it can also be used to manage the figures you need for service availability management:

  • Uptime of the system
  • Planned and unplanned downtime of the system

All service availability management functions are present using this FIORI tile:

On the left hand side there is the menu with all options:

Service availability management definitions

There are 2 definitions we need to configure:

  1. The outage customization
  2. Service availability definitions

First we start with the outage customizing:

Make the required settings for planned and unplanned downtime.

Now you add a new service management definition:

Provide a name and validity date for the definition and use the + symbol to add systems for which the definition is relevant.

In the tab availability set the SLA threshold for the availability percentage:

If relevant you can set specific contractual maintenance time in the last tab:

Example of use for this tab: you are running your SAP system hosted on for example AWS or Azure. Those platforms can have scheduled maintenance as well. That is not in your control.

Carefully check your entries and definition before saving. They cannot easily be changed later!

You cannot delete an active definition. To make it inactive you need to change the end date of the definition to today, and then delete it next day.

Each system can only be in one SLA definition!

Classifying the outages

On the Outages overview you can see the outages. The outages can be 0, or there can be open and/or confirmed outages:

Click on the open alert to classify it (click once for the line, click on the line for the details):

Classify the outage (planned/unplanned) and set the status. Fill out the text to clarify. And then save the update.

Outage reporting

There are 2 main reports. The uptime and outage reporting. The uptime reporting shows how long your system is up since the last reported planned or unplanned downtime. This overview is not so useful.

The useful overview is the outage reporting which shows you the downtime per system and per month:

In the example above 1 system had outage, but that was short enough to still meet the SLA target. Availability was 99.64% versus SLA target over 99.5%.

System monitoring custom metric for message server disconnects

From availability perspective, you want to detect as quickly as possible if you are suffering from message server disconnects.

You can create a custom monitoring metric to measure and act on this.

Creation of the custom metric for message server disconnects

Create a custom metric following the steps in this blog. The template to be adjusted is the technical instance SAP ABAP 7.10 and higher template.

Don’t forget to tick it on for monitoring otherwise it is not active.

In expert mode create a custom metric.

Create technical name Z_MESSAGE_SERVER_DISCONNECT:

In the data collection:

Data to enter: diagnostics agent (push). Select ABAP read SysLog. Filter on message number Q0L, Q0M and Q0N. Any of those indicate message server errors. For more information on system log messages, read this blog.

Define the threshold for alerting:

And assign the metric to the ABAP Instance not available alert group:

System monitoring custom metric for user lock status

From security perspective, you want to validate that 2 important users are locked in the main system clients: SAP* and DDIC.

You can create a custom monitoring metric to measure and act on this.

Creation of the custom metric for user lock status

Create a custom metric following the steps in this blog. The template to be adjusted is the technical system SAP ABAP 7.10 and higher template.

Don’t forget to tick it on for monitoring otherwise it is not active.

In expert mode create a custom metric.

Create technical name ZUSER_LOCK_STATUS:

In the data collection:

Data to enter: RFC diagnostics agent (push). User Lock status Data collector. Enter as parameters the user ID (DDIC) and the COLLECTOR_CONTEXT_ID as TECHNICAL_SYSTEM.

Set the threshold as a text threshold:

Set the red rating in case the string contains the word ‘not locked’ and set to green in case it contains the word ‘locked’.

Now assign it to Alert group for locked users:

Save the metric.

Repeat the same for SAP*.

Alert Management overview

The alert management function is a central alert inbox function for SAP Focused Run. All alerts from all tools are coming together in the alert inbox.

Questions that will be answered in this blog are:

  • Which alerts are sent to the Alert inbox?
  • How to organize alert handling?
  • How to execute alert review?
  • How to reduce the amount of open alerts?

For practical use of the alert management function, read this dedicated blog.

Alert inbox

All alerts from all SAP Focused Run monitoring tools end up in the Alert Inbox:

This can be alerts from:

Don't let yourself be impressed by the high amount of alerts: this counter is across all tools and all systems, including non production. After some fine tuning of monitoring templates and thresholds, and clean up in the systems, this number will go down fast.

Alert handling

An alert is sent to the alert inbox. But for each alert you can configure as well if an alert is e-mailed, and/or send to external tool like ServiceNow.

The alert inbox has a scope filter just like all the other Focused Run tools. Use it to filter the alerts for you most important systems (most likely the productive systems, or even filter on the core S4HANA and/or ECC systems).

Depending on your organizational structure and amounts of systems, you need to agree on how you handle the alerts. Aspects to be taken care of:

  • Prioritization of alerts; which ones go first? Solutions:
    • Use filters for important systems
    • First red alerts, then yellow alerts
      • Fine tune alert thresholds to reduce invalid red alerts
  • Assign processor or not: for larger teams do assign a processor to keep track
  • Fill out comments for alerts that take longer to solve, so you track what has been done
  • Consider to postpone alerts that require a change to get fixed (and the change takes a longer time to implement)
  • Using the SLA functions or not?
  • Who is allowed to confirm an alert?

Alert review

You can use the initial alert dashboard, or the alert reporting overview, or create your own dashboards:

The overview shows the open alerts:

At the start of your SAP Focused Run implementation you should at least weekly review this. It gives you insights into:

  • The type of alerts most frequently popping up
  • The systems that generate the most alerts
  • The average time an alert is open

When you are getting more mature and used to solving the issues and alerts, you can reduce the alert review frequency to for example monthly.

Open alert reduction

To reduce the open alerts consider this sequence:

  • Solve the issues in the systems: clean up, apply permanent solutions
  • Fine tune the metric thresholds for false alerts, and classify not so important alerts as yellow: keep red for the important alerts
  • Work on the resolution time: also here, focus on the red alerts which are important

Bad practices (often deployed by KPI drive service providers):

  • Increase thresholds, without clean up or without solving the issues permanently
  • Simply close each repetitive alert fast without checking and solving the root cause for repetitive failure
  • Only look at subsection of the alerts
  • Don’t look at self monitoring items (without solving self monitoring issues)
  • Blame Focused Run for having bugs (without looking for OSS notes and without reporting issues)
  • Don’t confirm the alerts (so they keep open and don’t send new mails, or don’t create new ServiceNow tickets)

If you are confronted with such a service provider, use the alerting reporting tools also for the closed alerts to find evidences of such behaviors.

Missed alerts

After incidents you have (mainly in your productive system), check if Focused Run generated the proper alert or not.

Cases that can happen:

  • Focused Run did alert the situation, but it was not picked up fast enough by the processors: organizational measures, or consider the mail sending option
  • Focused Run did measure the situation, but the alert was not configured (for example batch job alert was not set)
  • Focused Run did measure the situation, but the threshold was not reached: lower the threshold in the template
  • Focused Run did measure the situation, but it was not specific enough. This can happen with SM21 system messages. Consider creation of very specific custom metrics for specific messages (for example for application server connectivity loss to database).
  • Focused Run did not measure the situation: check if you can activate an out-of-the-box monitoring item for the situation. Not all measurements are active in the templates by default. If no out-of-the box exists, consider creating a custom metric. Or check if you can monitor side-effects of occurring bad situations.

The goal of this analysis is to keep improving the alerting accuracy: alerts should not be missed and valid (not false).

Cloud monitoring overview

The integration and cloud monitoring function of SAP Focused Run consists of 2 main functions:

  • Cloud monitoring between on premise and cloud SAP products
  • Interface monitoring between SAP systems (read more on interface monitoring in this blog)

This blog will give an overview of the Cloud monitoring between SAP on premises systems and SAP cloud solutions.

Questions that will be answered in this blog are:

  • How does the Cloud monitoring in SAP Focused Run look like?
  • How much details and history can I see in SAP Focused Run interface monitoring?
  • Can I link an Cloud monitoring event to and alert?
  • Which Cloud monitoring scenarios are supported?

Cloud monitoring

To start the cloud monitoring click on the FIORI tile:

Select the cloud scenarios:

You now reach the scenario overview screen:

Click on the tile for details (we will take Ariba as example):

Click on the red line between the on premise and the cloud system:

Click on the red errors number for the error overview:

Click on specific error:

Supported cloud scenarios

Not all cloud products and scenarios of SAP are supported via SAP Focused Run Cloud monitoring. On the SAP Focused Run Expert Portal the following scenarios are currently published:

Read the scenario details carefully! Inside the details there might be less monitored than you were expecting.

Could monitoring setup

The setup for cloud monitoring will be explained in a future blog.

Interface monitoring: web service monitoring

The generic interface monitoring setup in SAP Focused Run is explained in thisĀ blog. This blog will zoom into monitoring of web services.

Web services monitoring automates the monitoring in transaction SRT_MONI, which is extensively explained in this blog.

This monitoring does not check the connection availability of the web service. To make that happen, you would need to install a custom program from this blog, that writes an entry to SM21. From the SM21 entry, you can create a custom monitoring metric that alerts on the connection issue. How to setup custom metrics is explained in this blog.

Data collection and alerting setup

In the configuration for interface monitoring in the Technical System settings, goto the monitoring part and activate the data collection for Web Service Errors:

In the monitoring settings, you can filter on specific criteria, or leave everything blank to report on everything:

In the alerting part check you can choose between amount of entries and number of error entries:

And set the filters for the alerting:

The filter for monitoring and alerting can be different. It could be you want to monitor all errors, but only activate specific important ones.

Save your monitoring data collection and alerting settings.

Graphical modelling

In the graphical modelling add the filter between two systems for the web service monitoring:

Also here: first scroll down to see the OK button. Press first OK before pressing Save, or you might loose the data and have to re-enter it. This it bit annoying in the UI.

Monitoring usage

The end result looks as follows:

You can click on the errors or success messages and zoom all the way down to individual messages:

Interface monitoring: qRFC monitoring

The generic interface monitoring setup in SAP Focused Run is explained in this blog. This blog will zoom into monitoring of qRFC connections, which are frequently used in communication from ECC to EWM and SCM systems.

OSS notes for bug fixing

Please make sure bug fix OSS note 3014667 – Wrong parameter for QRFC alerts is applied before starting with qRFC monitoring.

Data collection and alerting setup

In the configuration for interface monitoring in the Technical System settings, goto the monitoring part and activate the data collection for qRFC Errors:

In the monitoring settings, you can filter on specific queues, direction and RFC name, or leave everything blank to report on everything:

In the alerting part check you can choose between age of qRFC entries and number of entries:

And set the filters for which ones, and the metric threshold for CRITICAL errors:

The filter for monitoring and alerting can be different. It could be you want to monitor all errors, but only activate specific important ones.

Save your monitoring data collection and alerting settings.

Queued RFC’s are normally back and forth between 2 systems. If this is the case you have to make the settings for both systems.

Graphical modelling

In the graphical modelling add the filter between two systems for the qRFC monitoring:

Also here: first scroll down to see the OK button. Press first OK before pressing Save, or you might loose the data and have to re-enter it. This it bit annoying in the UI.

Queued RFC’s are normally back and forth between 2 systems. If this is the case you have to make the settings for both systems. You model first one direction and then model the direction back:

Monitoring usage

The end result in operations looks as follows:

You can see here qRFC is modelled back and forth between 2 systems. The blue line indicates messages in process. The red line is clicked on. Here you can see both messages in process and errors. Click on the red error number gives the details:

Interface monitoring: ODATA gateway monitoring

The generic interface monitoring setup in SAP Focused Run is explained in this blog. This blog will zoom into monitoring of ODATA gateway connections.

We assume in this use case that end users are using the ODATA in FIORI apps. In case ODATA is consumed by external applications like Tibco, Mulesoft, Mirai, Mendix, etc., you have to replace USER with the corresponding application.

Model end users in LMDB

Before we can start the scenario modelling, we first need to model the end users in LMDB as a Unspecific Standalone Application System), just like we did for TIBCO in this blog.

Name the ‘system’ USER:

Make sure the status is Active.

Add this new system USER to the Technical System list in the Integration Monitoring setup.

The system will be display only.

Data collection and alerting setup

In the configuration for interface monitoring in the Technical System settings, goto the monitoring part and activate the data collection for Gateway Errors:

In the monitoring settings, you can filter on specific items if wanted, or leave everything blank to report on any error:

In the tab alerting setup the alerting:

The filter for monitoring and alerting can be different. It cloud be you want to monitor all errors, but only activate specific important ones.

Save your monitoring data collection and alerting settings.

Graphical modelling

In the graphical modelling add the backend system and the system created for USER:

Now add the link starting with USER towards the backend system:

Save your changes.

Also here: first scroll down to see the OK button. Press first OK before pressing Save, or you might loose the data and have to re-enter it. This it bit annoying in the UI.

Monitoring usage

The end result in operations looks as follows:

In the graphical overview click on the red line. The screen with the exceptions opens. Click on the red number to see the overview:

Here you can see the trends and zoom into the specific errors:

Interface monitoring: RFC monitoring

The generic interface monitoring setup in SAP Focused Run is explained in this blog. This blog will zoom into monitoring of RFC connections.

RFC’s between SAP systems

RFC’s with fixed user ID

The basic setup of monitoring RFC’s was explained as example for the generic interface monitoring setup in this blog already.

Trusted RFC’s

This RFC was an RFC with a fixed user ID. If you have to setup an RFC monitoring for a trusted RFC (for example between Netweaver Gateway system and ECC system), then you have to take care of the user ID’s and rights. The system from which the SM59 test will run, will use that Focused Run user ID to log on to the other system. If your user ID’s are unique for each system you have to create the user ID in the other systems with the rights to be able to execute a ping and logon for the test.

End result RFC checks

The end results of the RFC is list of RFC’s with the latency time, availability and logon test overview:

Transactional RFC towards external system

To monitor transactional RFC (type T) towards an external system like TIBCO, Mulesoft, etc, you first need to model the external system in the LMDB. To do this goto the LMDB maintenance FIORI app:

Then select Single Customer Network and select the option Technical Systems. In this section choose the Type Unspecific Standalone Application System:

And press Create:

Fill out the details and Save. Make sure the status is Active.

Now the system can be added in the configuration of technical systems in the Interface monitoring configuration:

Now you can model the tRFC interface connection monitoring:

Interface monitoring setup

In the previous blog on Interface Monitoring overview, we have explained the global functions of interface monitoring.

This blog will zoom into the setup parts. We will use a simple scenario to monitor a central user administration system which has RFC connections to the CUA child systems. Basically check that the connection in SM59 is working. More on CUA can be read in this blog.

Questions that will be answered in this blog are:

  • How can I enable my systems for interface monitoring?
  • How do I set up a scenario to monitor?
  • How do I setup alerting for an interface scenario?

Concept

The concept for interface monitoring is unfortunately bit confusing at first.

There are 2 main things to remember:

  1. Systems data collection and alerting: this is where the action happens
  2. Graphical representation: this is where you make it visible

Unfortunately this means you have to do lot of double work.

Set up systems

Goto the Integration and cloud monitoring FIORI tile:

On top right click on the configuration icon to change or add a scenario:

First add the systems:

Select the system:

Select the configuration categories:

Select the monitoring:

Here you must add the connections you want to monitor.

The alerting configuration is empty initially:

We will fill this later if we want alerts for a specific interface connection.

Save this system and repeat for the rest of the systems.

The system determines the actual data collection and actual alerting. The system can be re-used in multiple scenarios.

Scenario configuration

On the configuration screen now add the new scenario. Add a name and description for the scenario:

In the topology screen now add the systems in the drop down for Node Selection and use the + icon to add them to the screen:

Now select the source system (we will have 1 CUA central and 2 child systems) and select the Action box:

Select Add link to and then select the system.

Now add a filter to the link by clicking on the line:

In the dialog screen on the right now add the details:

Start by giving the group a name. Now add the filter. Give the filter a name (in this case RFC1). Select the central component and the category (in this case Connection monitoring SM59). Now add the RFC connection type (3) and connection name to be monitored.

Very important here: press Ok first to transfer the data. Only then press Save. Otherwise your data is lost. SAP UI is not ok for this area.

Repeat for the second scenario. The end result is that the dotted lines are replaced by straight lines:

Then Save.

The scenario is active now:

Reminder: you did have to add the same information in the system level as well in the Technical System as well: this will perform the data collection itself. If this is not done, then the scenario overview will show grey results for missing data collection.

The scenario is to make the interfaces graphical visible.

Adding alert

When you have monitored the scenario long enough to see it is stable, the next step is to setup alerting so you get notified in the central alert inbox.

First add the alert in the Technical System as shown above. This will be the actual alert definition.

To add an alert to the graphical overview, go to the scenario definition and select the source system. Press the button alerts for component:

On the right hand side now add the alert by clicking the + button:

Then select the wanted Alert Category. And select the filter options. Add the connections for which you want to alert:

Give the filter also a name.

On the Description field you can set the alert to active:

You can also set the frequency of checking, and if an notification is to be send as well (via mail or towards outbound connector).

Also important here: first press Ok, then Save. Otherwise the data is lost. SAP UI is not ok for this area.

Summary and final check

After you have finished the graphical topology, you need to go back to the Systems overview to validate if everything is activated ok for both monitoring and alerting:

Reminder: there is a split in graphical representation in the topology and scenarios and the actual system monitoring and alerting in the Technical System overview.

Specific topics

For specific interface monitoring topics read these dedicated blogs: